Tag: Constantino Brumidi

Constantino Brumidi, the Michelangelo of the Capitol

Constantino Brumidi, the Michelangelo of the Capitol

| January 7, 2017 | 0 Comments

Constantino Brumidi (1805–1880) is best known for the murals he painted in the United States Capitol over a 25-year period, including the Apotheosis of Washington, the Frieze of American History and the walls of the Brumidi Corridors. His artistic vision was based on the wall paintings of ancient Rome and Pompeii and on the classical revivals […]

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The Capitol Building

The Capitol Building

| March 7, 2012

The U.S. Capitol is a landmark of neoclassical architecture. Its designs derived from ancient Greece and Rome evoke the ideals that guided the nation’s founders as they framed their new republic. Within the building you will find majestic paintings, sculptures, and other works of fine art that depict various periods in American history. The heart […]

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Constantino Brumidi, The Michelangelo of the Capitol Remembered in Washington DC Ceremonies

Constantino Brumidi, The Michelangelo of the Capitol Remembered in Washington DC Ceremonies

| March 6, 2012 | 0 Comments

Constantino Brumidi, the artist of our nation’s Capitol who has been compared to Michelangelo, was an Italian immigrant, who like so many others, fell in love with America and never left. Brumidi and his artistic legacy were recently remembered in Washington, D.C. when Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring February 19, as Constantino Brumidi […]

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Washington D.C. Passes Resolution Recognizing Italy’s 150th Anniversary

Washington D.C. Passes Resolution Recognizing Italy’s 150th Anniversary

| March 6, 2012 | 0 Comments

On March 6,  the District of Columbia Council unanimously passed a resolution recognizing the 150th anniversary of Italy becoming a modern country. This historic event occurred on March 17, 1861 is officially called the Unification of Italy. The resolution introduced by Ward 2 Councilmember Jack Evans also recognizes the influence of Italy on Washington architecture, including the […]

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